Sternberg’s cooking school – sophisticated recipes with nectarines

opinion Sternberg’s Cooking School, part 67

This is how you can make something special out of nectarines

A firm nectarine makes a crunchy ingredient for salads, the Stembergs say

A firm nectarine makes a crunchy ingredient for salads, the Stembergs say

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The Stembergs from the restaurant Haus Stemberg in Velbert explain the ABC of cooking. In this part it’s refined: There’s nectarine salad and nectarine chimichurri—a poem about pasta or grilled meat.

LFor a long time, nectarines played almost no role in our cuisine. It wasn’t until Sascha and his wife’s children grew up and grabbed almost every nectarine they got in the summer – they still love nectarines to this day – that we realized what a wonderful fruit it was.

Not only is the nectarine – a kind of mutation of the peach that nature created willingly – a wonderful refreshment on hot days and full of vitamins and potassium to the brim: it strengthens the nerves, protects the heart and calms the circulation. Vitamin B3 also has a mood-enhancing effect. However, from a chef’s point of view, the stone fruit impresses above all because it is juicy, sweet, tart and tart all at the same time. This variety of properties makes them an ingredient that can be combined in many ways.

Nectarines are grown in Italy, France, Spain, Greece and the USA. But for some time also in Germany, for example in the Altes Land near Hamburg, which is known mainly for its apples. When buying, make sure the nectarine is always a little pressure sensitive, meaning it should give a little when you press it gently. Unlike bananas, mangoes or avocados, they are not ripened at home.

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Nectarines are easy to process in almost any condition, so they don’t need to be fully ripe and soft when you buy them. A still somewhat firm nectarine, cut into thin slices, is a crunchy ingredient for salads. Add some caramelized goat cheese and some nuts and you have a healthy and delicious lunchtime snack. Nectarine also goes well with broccoli or roasted cauliflower – with its sweet and sour note, it’s a wonderful addition to slightly bitter vegetables and takes them to the next level.

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A few weeks ago we shared a recipe for a chimichurri, a traditional BBQ dip, here. A chimichurri can also be prepared with a nectarine base. Summer is nearing its peak and, alas, its end – celebrate it by introducing a new flavor to the barbecue.

Here’s how to make a nectarine chimichurri: Take two firm (but not too firm) nectarines. It’s always a bit like playing the supermarket lottery. If you lightly touch ten nectarines with your hands, you may discover one that will work. What you also need: the juice and zest of a lime. Two tablespoons of chopped fresh coriander. Two tablespoons of chopped flat-leaf parsley. Two spoons of finely chopped onion. 2 tablespoons toasted, chopped pine nuts (alternatively cashew or sunflower seeds). A clove of garlic, finely minced. A teaspoon of tomato paste. Salt, pepper and some tabasco (green) if you like it hot.

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Split the nectarine in half and turn the halves in opposite directions to separate them from the pit. Then cut the halves in half and remove the remnants from the core. Then cut the meat into slices, then the slices into small, fine cubes. Now mix all the ingredients together, mix well and season to taste. Leave in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for 48 hours.

Nectarine chimichurri can be refrigerated for up to three weeks. It is not only enjoyed with grilled meat, but also with toast or warm goat cheese and salad. It also goes well with pasta dishes. Crumble some blue cheese over the pasta and top with nectarine chimichurri – a poem.

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